Monthly Archives: January 2017

Cut Lotus Root

Review of Chang’an: a Story of China & Japan by Wena Poon (CreateSpace, 2016) by Eric Norris Chang’an: a Story of China & Japan is a compellingly and compulsively readable family saga that spans the long and terrible 20th century:

Cut Lotus Root

Review of Chang’an: a Story of China & Japan by Wena Poon (CreateSpace, 2016) by Eric Norris Chang’an: a Story of China & Japan is a compellingly and compulsively readable family saga that spans the long and terrible 20th century:

“If you go deep enough…”

Review of Philip Holden’s Heaven Has Eyes (Singapore: Epigram Books, 2016) by Stewart Dorward   Heaven Has Eyes is a first work of fiction by Philip Holden, a professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at the National

“If you go deep enough…”

Review of Philip Holden’s Heaven Has Eyes (Singapore: Epigram Books, 2016) by Stewart Dorward   Heaven Has Eyes is a first work of fiction by Philip Holden, a professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at the National

How to Build an American Home

Review of Jennifer S. Cheng’s House A (USA: Omnidawn, 2016) by Tse Hao Guang   Jennifer S. Cheng’s debut collection of poems House A draws power from repetition, like waves or the stacking of bricks. It’s torn between wanting to

How to Build an American Home

Review of Jennifer S. Cheng’s House A (USA: Omnidawn, 2016) by Tse Hao Guang   Jennifer S. Cheng’s debut collection of poems House A draws power from repetition, like waves or the stacking of bricks. It’s torn between wanting to

The Writer as Historian

The Writer as Historian: Written Country as Historiography by P. J. Thum   In the introduction of Written Country (Singapore: Landmark Books, 2016), editor Gwee Li Sui sets up his central premise: the writer as historian and literature as historical

The Writer as Historian

The Writer as Historian: Written Country as Historiography by P. J. Thum   In the introduction of Written Country (Singapore: Landmark Books, 2016), editor Gwee Li Sui sets up his central premise: the writer as historian and literature as historical